The Murders of Mary Crouch and Mary Daly


Mrs. Mary Crouch and Miss Mary Daly accompanied Pvt. George Allen on a carriage into Watertown, where they attended a dance at Scovill's. Pvt. Allen was with the U.S. 9th Infantry stationed at Sackets Harbor. After the dance, they set out for Sackets Harbor along the Dexter-Military Road. In the morning, the carriage was found in its stable with the mutilated bodies of Daly and Crouch still in their seats. Mr. Allen was found later in the afternoon. He was carried back to Madison Barracks badly wounded.

In the trial that ensued, Allen pointed the finger at Wilbur Crouch, the estranged husband of Mrs. Mary Crouch. Investigations of the alleged crime scene, however, only revealed one set of man's footprints in the soil. That soil matched the soil on Mary Daly's dress. Further autopsy showed Mrs. Daly to have been shot at close range, no more than four inches. Pvt. Allen's wounds were also found to have been self-inflicted. In cross-examination of witness testimony, Allen's story didn't hold up and Mr. Crouch was acquitted. Allen was later arrested and charged with the double murder.

The investigation showed that Allen shot Mrs. Crouch several times from a position outside the carriage. Miss Daly then ran from the carriage, but Allen caught her, shot her at close range, and then dragged her body back and placed her in the seat. He then set the horses on a run back to the stable. On his own way back, he attempted suicide, but he failed and hid under a bridge where he lost consciousness. He was found and taken to the post hospital where he recovered. In the meantime, he had concocted the story based on Mr. Crouch's well-known jealousy and occasional fits of rage.

Allen was convicted of the double murder and sentenced to life in prison. He served his sentence at Auburn State Prison.

Notorious Crime in Jefferson County